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As addicts, drugs and alcohol take over our actions, as well as our thoughts. The “great obsession” of using liquefies any desire to pursue interests that we either used to love or might find enriching to our lives. Refreshed and renewed, many of us feel the overwhelming need to replenish our desires with healthy actions. And this is where the concept of a new #drugofchoice is formulated.



Discover Your Character Traits, Goals & Purpose

Our 12-step fellowship provides a roadmap to uncover the reasons for our addiction. In our 4th step, we list with complete abandon an inventory of our resentments, fears and defects of character, connecting the dots between our pattern of behavior and our addiction. This self-cleanse allows us to bear witness to all of our deepest ailments and then enables us to let them go and work on our defects in the future. It takes courage to dig into our disease and let that become a part of our growth. Recovering addicts are given strength through their vulnerability when they admit their personal faults and actively work on them.

This process relieves us of the things that are holding us back from discovering our true passions. Now, with a renewed sense of self and clarity, there is no better time to discover your true potential. In reading through a number of books on life, awareness and happiness, I realized that many of them encouraged positive personal identification, which included things like skills, natural born talents, character traits and passions. I found myself surprised that I there was no worksheet on taking a positive inventory to identify personal qualities, outlining how one could offer their gifts to the world and pursue their passions in life.

This notion struck a nerve because I believe many of us identify, both prior to and after getting sober, with a fear of the future. In truth, how exactly can we have energy and optimism for the future if we have not identified a path to walk toward it?

You may ask yourself: What is my calling? What are my dreams? How can I ever achieve them? How do I deal with life now? We’ve won the lottery by finding recovery. In many ways we have been “reborn”. We’ve also been granted time and mental space to work on what we most desire. Think about how much better your sobriety will be if you put energy into your dreams and goals? Now that is a great way to create a positive foundation in recovery.

You owe it to yourself to discover your passion and purpose. You can start today with an exercise I’ll call a “Reverse 4th Step”. List the personal attributes you value which strengthen your character and what you can offer the world. Start by making lists of these qualities by following this simple guide:

  1. List the talents you are born with (your natural abilities, aptitudes)
  2. List skills that you have developed or mastered (sports, technologies, art, singing)
  3. List your education & experiences that have made you uniquely specialized (training, travel, etc.)
  4. List your character traits of the spirit (courageous, empathetic, optimistic, grace under pressure)
  5. List your top, most memorable accomplishments (winning a race, best-in-class)
  6. List your values (family, honesty, freedom)

Next, discover your passion and purpose. Most people don’t know what their passion and purpose is because they have never tried to figure it out. You can begin reaching your dreams by first writing them down. According to Dave Kohn, professor emeritus at Virginia Tech, people who regularly write down their goals earn 9x as much over their lifetimes as the people who don’t. Make this list positive, specific and measurable. You would be amazed at how attainable your dreams are if you take the time to identify your ambitions.

By connecting your natural abilities and character traits with the things you are passionate about, you can pursue goals in your life that align with your real purpose. For example, if you are a naturally gifted skier and have a high level of patience, perhaps becoming a ski instructor would be a well suited job for you. Maybe you are extremely good under pressure and love high-energy. You might want to consider a profession in an emergency room or trauma center. If travel is a passion of yours and you’re an excellent writer, decide to embark on a travel blog and share your experiences with the world.

If you follow your passion money and success will naturally follow, not the other way around. The same goes for your journey in sobriety. While identifying our character defects helps us work on being better people in the future, focusing on our character traits can help us pursue the dreams of our innermost soul. Think of your life ahead as an empty canvas: visualize life’s coming attractions by identifying your unique traits and by setting goals because possibilities, adventure, accomplishment, contribution and happiness are waiting.



 Addicts Achieve Sobriety Through Rehab

Each year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse releases a report detailing a number of statistics on substance abuse treatment facilities throughout the country, in addition to sharing some global statistics on the prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse happening within our population.

Addiction is commonly disguised or silenced for most individuals and families, as there is still a prevailing stigma around the topic, but the numbers don’t lie. It is estimated that annually, 23.1 million Americans are in need of some form of treatment, including addictions to alcohol, illicit drugs and prescription medication. In 2013, only 2.5 million people received the needed treatment, about 10% of all afflicted.

Of those in need of treatment, last year 88,000 died as a result of alcohol use in addition to the over 22,500 deaths that occurred form illicit drug use. The most startling figure was the rise in deaths due to heroin overdose, which jumped from approximately 3,000 deaths in 2001 to 8,000 deaths in 2013. Nationally, it is estimated that 1 in every 10 deaths that occur are alcohol related.

It has never been more important to educate our community on the prevalence of drug and alcohol addiction. Today, because of the need for long-term treatment centers as well as the Affordable Care Act, passed just last year, finding and enrolling in a treatment center that fits your needs or a loved one is more accessible than ever. If insured, most clients can have access to a full-service treatment facility at almost no charge. There are over 14,500 treatment centers in the United States, all of which offer different levels of care and accept all types of insurance plans. In addition, many treatment facilities offer scholarships to offset the cost of treatment.

And with treatment, recovery is possible. One of the most successful paths to recovery is committing to a 30 day treatment program. Those who enroll in an inpatient treatment program within 30 days of detoxing stand a better chance at achieving long term sobriety than those who don’t. For those who do relapse, it takes them 40% longer to do so than individuals who abstain without the help of a treatment center. It’s important to understand that for many people, relapse is a part of their path toward recovery. Studies suggest that those who have attended treatment gain the tools and faith needed to overcome their addictions, even when relapse occurs.

Studies also show that those who went through an inpatient program noted improvements in their quality of life, even if abstinence was short lived. In the short term, patients are looking to stay sober. In the long run, clients are able to live a life of integrity, honesty, balance and happiness.

If you are someone who needs the help of an inpatient treatment program, or know someone who does, contact one of our team members at The Hope Center for Rehabilitation at 1.866.233.1869



Signs That Show You Are Drug or Alcohol Dependent

1. Tolerance
Have you noticed needing to use more of the same substance to get the desired effect? Our bodies grow increasingly more tolerant of drugs and alcohol the more often we use them. Tolerance is a signal of abuse and your bodies way of handling the toxicity. In reality you are allowing your body the ability to absorb more toxins when you increase your tolerance.
2. Withdrawal
As drugs or alcohol leave the body, classic symptoms of withdrawal set it. These include anxiety, jumpiness, shakiness, trembling, sweating, nausea, vomiting, insomnia, depression, irritability, loss of appetite, fatigue and headaches. Severe withdrawal can include seizures, hallucinations, fever and even death, especially for alcoholics. Your body, which is getting used to having the drugs and alcohol in your system, is reacting to the void. To calm these symptoms, addicts and alcoholics drink or use to calm their symptoms, or to avoid symptoms at all. Many turn into morning drinkers or all-day drug abusers.
3. Loss of Control
Have you found yourself drinking or using more than you wanted to, and for a longer time than you intended? This is a classic sign that your using is getting out of control, because you are no longer in charge of when you choose to stop using. Many consider this the powerful “obsession” of using.
4. Desire to Stop But Can’t
You’ve identified that your drinking or drugging problem is causing negative consequences in your life. But despite changing up your routine, using in different ways or trying to abstain altogether, you find you cannot quit. This is also a classic signal that you or a loved one are in need of professional help to relieve you of your dependency.
5. Neglecting Other Activities
As drugs and alcohol become an everyday need, it requires more time to get and use them in daily life. Addicts find themselves doing less of the activities they used to enjoy in order to concentrate more on their drug of choice. In addition, it can become difficult to do some of the activities they once enjoyed while under the influence of powerfully mind and mood altering substances.
6. Continue To Use Despite Negative Consequences:
As drugs and alcohol become abused with greater frequency, it commonly interrupts daily life and leads to substantial issues with family, loved ones, the law, your career and ones health. What maybe used to seem unimaginable becomes reality like incarceration, loss of relationships, loss of jobs and a deterioration in health. Despite these radical consequences, the power of addiction usually overwhelms these dire circumstances and the user finds themselves relying more than ever on their drug of choice.
If you’re not sure if you or a loved one are exhibiting these symptoms, there are also other warning signs to be on the lookout for. Some include weight loss or gain, loss in appetite, seizures, unexplained accidents or injuries, shakes, tremors, slurred speech, drop in performance or attendance, unusual need for money (borrowing, stealing or missing valuables), frequent arguments, unexplained change in attitude and mood, frequent irritability, outbursts, unusual hyperactivity, lack of motivation and paranoia.
It’s important to remember that these are all normal reactions to drug and alcohol abuse. After a time, it becomes difficult even for the most determined people to kick their addiction without outside help and a dramatic lifestyle change. If you think you may have an addiction problem, or know someone who is showing these signals, call one of our specialists at 1-866-233-1869 and they’ll be happy to recommend a treatment plan to overcome the powerful obsession of addiction.



Invest In Your Future with Vocational Rehabilitation

Often, the most difficult part of the recovery process is adjusting to the responsibilities and requirements of real life as well as managing the consequences from addiction. The Hope Center has a staff dedicated to helping clients successfully maneuver back into the real world without the overwhelming stress of having to balance a life of recovery with building back a future by offering Vocational Rehabilitation. This is a process which enables clients to overcome barriers to accessing, maintaining or returning to a normal way of life and employment. In addition, vocational rehabilitation offers opportunities for clients to discover their own hobbies so they can pursue a life they’ve always imagined with a new foundation in recovery.

For those who are still in school, or are looking to advance their education, our on-staff Director of Education aids each client, who can choose to receive tutoring to obtain a GED or diploma. They are also available to help with the application process for colleges or assist in resume building and job placement if a client has already completed their schooling.

For clients who already have a career history and are in need of proper job placement, our facilitators will help with resume building and interview skills. In addition, we have a strong local network of professionals who can help our clients receive job placement so they can begin working during their long-term recovery process. It is recommended that a client stay 6-9 months at a facility for the best chance at achieving long-term sobriety. With the help of local job placement, even temporarily, we can help our clients build a strong foundation for when they are ready to return home full-time.

For clients who are in need of case management, our therapists work on an individual basis with them to ensure their appointments are met and that they are adhering to the guidelines of their judgements. We’ve seen many people become overwhelmed with their legal consequences, resulting in anxiety, depression and often relapse. At the Hope Center, our team is committed to supporting our clients through this often confusing time so they can remain connected to their sobriety, not their sentences.

The Hope Center prides itself on offering residents extra-curricular activities not only to add diversity and enjoyment to the day but to open clients up to activities they may have put on hold, or never even tried in the past. Addiction often takes over the desire to pursue hobbies and other interests in order to use more often. In recovery, we want to deliver our clients activities that will help them reconnect to their former or emerging passions. Some of our specialized activities include yoga, art classes, kayaking, zip-lining, beach trips, movies, paddle boarding, fitness training, snorkeling, wake boarding and group games like softball, soccer and volley ball.

The Hope Center for Rehabilitation, located in Boynton Beach, FL, offers a variety of rehabilitation services including in-patient and out-patient programs to help clients form a foundation of recovery for practically any lifestyle arrangement. To learn more about our services, contact one of our specialists at 1.866.233.1869.



Reinvigorating Your Spiritual Foundation in Recovery

When I was early in sobriety, I once heard a man share at a meeting that he “would give up his 30 years for anyone’s 3 months.” At the time I can’t say I really understood what he meant because I so envied his achievement. But today, that message was loud, clear and on point.

He was referring to the “Pink Cloud” stage that many people reach in sobriety. Its’ a multifaceted state of mind when the drugs and alcohol have left you for long enough that you can feel again and are beginning to really connect with other sober supports. At this phase, the Big Book starts to really make sense and more than likely your relationship with yourself and your loved ones is improving after years, or maybe even decades of neglect.

It’s similar to the felling you get when you’re first in love or have reached a lifelong goal. You have a sense of peace, accomplishment, security and blind faith in this beginning phase of real recovery. But like love, the feelings fade over time and moments of enlightenment become less frequent. Perhaps you’ve noticed yourself pulling away from regular meetings you used to attend, or are calling your sponsor less or maybe you’re just feeling more disconnected from your program.

I can tell you almost everyone at some point “loses the magic”, if you ever achieved it at all. If you’re left looking back longingly on the days when your spiritual connection was thriving, here are some ways to reignite the passion for your program.

1. Go To A Meet You’ve Never Been To Before
Typically our regular meetings, like all routines, start to feel redundant. But with thousands of meeting going on every day throughout the country, there is always a new group to introduce yourself to and to be inspired by. One of my favorite things to do when I’m in a new city is to make it to at least 1 meeting while I’m there. Each new meeting is an opportunity to network and hear an inspirational message. It’s also a great way to expand on your support network. And today, finding a meeting close by has never been easier. Download the Meeting Finder app onto your phone to locate a meeting anywhere in the world based on your location. Intergroup will also provide you with the latest meeting information. Visit http://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/find-aa-resources for information to contact your local intergroup office.

2. Raise Your Hand To Be A Sponsor
The whole sponsor relationship thing is a little daunting, for both sponsors and sponsees. Overcoming your fear to ask someone to sponsor you takes motivation and courage. To raise your hand and offer your help to someone newly sober also takes guts. But the reward is profound. Do you remember what it felt like in early sobriety to have someone answer your daily phone call, meet with you to go over your steps and give you support and advice when you just didn’t know what to do? The spiritual reward of helping someone else early in sobriety will open so many doors back into your own journey early on, and allow you to freely share the gift you’ve been given. It’s our fellowships way of paying it forward. Sponsoring other men or women will help you grow further in your program, helping elevate you to a new “Pink Cloud” of your own.

3. Read Through Your 4th Step Again
You spent weeks or months writing a 4th step. This list of character defects, resentments and people you may have harmed is like your very own golden diary. In your 5th step you were able to release all of these fears that were holding you back from transcending to the next level of acceptance and change. Over time, we’re taught to quell these defects by practicing steps 10 and 11 on a daily basis. But if you’ve noticed that some of your defects begin popping up now and then, don’t be frustrated. We’re naturally apt to revert back to our instinctual nature. Take an evening to read through your 4th step. Remember, these moments or traits were part of a larger pattern. Take the lessons you discovered in your 5th step and try and make those adjustments on a daily basis. This will undoubtedly help bring you back to a more enlightened stage as you live vicariously through your step-work, connecting the feelings you had then with the growth you have now.

4. Go To A National Convention
When you attend a national convention of any sort, whether it’s work or hobby related, you’re making an investment in your understanding and growth in that area. When you attend a 12-step fellowship gathering, you’re making an investment also in your spiritual bank account. Thousands of people join together for a few days of saturated learning where guests have the unique experience of hearing inspirational stories, attending specifically designed workshops in addition to enjoying fun networking events. It is almost guaranteed you will leave reinvigorated. There are a number of conferences held around the country, and around the world every year. Start by checking out the events calendar at www.aagrapevine.org (the International Journal of AA). If you’re young and in recovery, The International Conference of Young People in Alcoholics Anonymous (ICYPAA) is an excellent event for you, bringing young AA members together from around the country. The conference will be holding it’s 57th gathering this September in Miami. Visit www.icypaa.org for more details. For more events, Young People in Recovery has chapters throughout the country (who meet weekly) and host regional conferences. Find out about your local chapter and upcoming events at www.youngpeopleinrecovery.org.

5. Commit to a 90 in 90
When I first got sober (for good) I made a commitment to attend 90 meetings in 90 days because that’s what I was told helped countless people get started on their journey in sobriety. What happened was I made a powerful foundation for my own program. When you make a commitment to attend a meeting a day, you get to experience a variety of different meeting formats in different areas, each of which are made up of different people. The gift in this commitment is that you just have to show up, and the miracle is given to you. On any occasion, you are present to hear an enriching story, or connection with a new member. Over time, you create accountability with people and build on your sober support network. If you’ve been in recovery for a while, it’s an excellent way to get back to your foundational roots especially because at each meeting, there is a new message or be heard or a re triggering of one you’ve long since forgotten about.

You certainly aren’t going to adopt each of these suggestions in 1 day but it’s a great roadmap to begin working on in the year ahead. So break out your 4th step, plan to hit a meeting you’ve never been to before, check out some upcoming conventions and get ready to jump back on that pink cloud!



Music and Recovery

Music can be a powerful tool in recovery, in minutes touching the epicenter of our emotional core. They can elicit feelings of the past, of good and bad days gone by, or give us hope for the future. But ultimately, the right ones take us right were we need to be: eliciting the healing powers of a good beat and solid lyrics. We’ve put together a list of some of our favorite songs to listen to for those who are struggling with addiction and those who have embraced a life of recovery.
1. Starting Over, Macklemore

The superstar, who is known for making powerfully written music with messages that hit our pop culture hard, released “Starting Over” to document his own experience with relapse. His lyrics document a truth for many addicts who attempt to get sober: that recovering from relapse is a hard pill to swallow and a tough road to walk down. For anyone struggling with relapse, this is a song rich with hope, as Macklemore famously says, “If I can be an example of getting sober, then I can be an example of starting over.”
2. It’s Been A While, Stained

Released in 2001, this chart topper doesn’t explicitly mention addiction except in 1 line. However, the message in the song most definitely relates to those in early recovery. The songwriter, Aaron Lewis, tells the story of someone reflecting on their past, living in regret and depression for their thoughts, feelings and actions. The song sheds light on many of the difficult feelings and consequences addicts face in early recovery after the absence of drugs and alcohol have made them feel again, a unique standpoint we haven’t seen in many other songs.
3. Breathe Me, Sia

Before Sia became the international pop star that we know her as today, she released the song “Breathe Me” in 2004, which you may have heard. This powerful song relates most with addicts who are in the midst of their disease, feeling lonely, weak and incapable of escaping themselves. So many people who need recovery fall into what seems like an endless circle of addiction, continually starting back at square 1. The lyrics are also relatable to those who suffer from other afflictions like food addiction and self-harming.
4. Everyone’s On It, Lilly Allen

Leave it to Lilly Allen to talk about a controversial issue: the prevalence of drug addiction, and twist it into a catchy euro-pop song. We love it! She gets right to the issue, explaining how drug dependency is affecting everyone both old and young, rich and poor. Allen sings “Why can’t we all just be honest. Admit to ourselves that everyone’s on it, from grown politicians to young adolescents, prescribing themselves anti-depressants”. She uses this song more specifically to exploit the reality that so many people are enabled to use prescription medication. Allen, who has very publicly had her own problems with addiction, makes this in-your-face jingle catchy with lines like “See your daughter’s depressed we’ll get her straight on the Prozac. But little do you know, she already takes crack”.
5. Hate Me, Blue October

This song, released in 2006, is completely unique in its message from the other songs we have on our list. It begins with a recording from the songwriter’s mother at the peak of his addiction, genuinely concerned for his wellbeing and coming from a place of love. His well-written words illustrate the grief we feel for our loved ones who suffer alongside us both during addiction and in recovery.
6. If The Breakman Turns My Way, Bright Eyes

The lead singer of Bright Eyes writes many songs about his struggles with addiction and experiences in recovery. This low key song elusively tells a story of listening to your inner voice and leaving for a place of respite and recovery from your daemons. Also, we think there is a unique correlation to the saving power of going to treatment. Lines like “All this automatic writing I have tried to understand, from a psychedelic angel who was tugging on my hand.

It’s an infinite coincidence but it doesn’t form a plan. So I’m headed for New England or the Paris of the South. Gonna find myself somewhere to level out”, make this one of our favorite unknown songs of recovery.
7. I’m Not Afraid, Eminem

We couldn’t complete our list without listing at least 1 seriously positive song about life in recovery, since after all achieving sobriety is one of the most positively life altering accomplishments one can attain. Also, we couldn’t end without announcing one of our favorite artists in recovery, Eminem. There are quite literally dozens of songs we could have chosen from any of his 8 albums, including his 2010 album titled “Recovery”. But we chose this song because of its positive message about the strength and support of the recovery community as well as a message of relief from the obsession of addiction that is achieved through a program of recovery.

Music is an extremely therapeutic tool for early recovery. In fact, some well-known artists have joined forces to build the movement “Rockers In Recovery”, a group of sober musicians who work together to spread the word of recovery through their music, hosting concerts throughout the country. To learn more about the organization or to catch one of their upcoming concerts, visit them at http://www.rockersinrecovery.org/.

For more information about The Hope Center for Recovery, and to learn about the unique therapy we offer including music therapy, call one of our team members 1.866.233.1869.



November 26, 2014 wolf_q5c4wqomRecovery0

So you’ve come to the decision that you need help with your addiction and are preparing to leave for treatment. Congratulations! You’ve already defeated one of the hardest challenges of getting sober; you’ve admitted that you need help. You’ve already picked out a treatment center or detox location, if you need one. You might find yourself asking questions like, what’s next? How do I prepare? Am I going to be safe? How am I going to get through this?

Calm your fears and take everything one-step at a time. Use these few helpful tidbits to prepare yourself and suitcase before you leave to get sober:

• Don’t pack like you are headed for vacation. Pack comfortable clothes that you will feel relaxed wearing multiple times. You won’t need to dress to impress so don’t worry about designer jeans or jewelry. Also, know that a lot of place won’t allow clothing with string, belts or shoelaces. Find this out ahead of time and pack accordingly.

• Write down contact information of family or immediate support.  You likely won’t be allowed to have your cell phone on hand but there will be phones. Make sure to have a copy of phone numbers of the people who make you smile to use as needed.

• Learn to love literature. Pick out some books that interest you and bring them with you. You’ll likely have a lot down time to yourself and books are a great way to escape some of the seriousness of recovery. Self help books may be great while in treatment but try to keep your reading material light and enjoyably relevant to your interests. Avoid any material that glamourizes use, sex and violence.

• Take a pen and notebook….and use both!  Write down your feelings and thoughts as often as possible. Write down what hurts, your fears, what’s happened in the past or each day. The notes you make now will be instrumental in your recovery moving forward.

• Don’t over-think anything and stay focused on your immediate tasks at hand – Recovery and Staying Sober. Your new responsibility and first priority is to stay sober. Leave your fears and worries about your home life, job or finances at the door. Focus on  your new goal of sobriety now and you’ll work the rest out later. You’re on an express train to being given a lot of suggestions, recommendations and information about addiction and recovery. So, just keep an open mind.

So as you’re about to leave, The Hope Center wishes you success your journey. The road to Recovery is not easy but will set you free from your addiction and lead you to a new way of thinking, a new life and new happiness.

What questions do you have about leaving for recovery? What are your thoughts?

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If you’ve ever been to a 12-step meeting yourself or sought advice from someone who has, you have inevitably heard several well-worn clichés. “One day at a time”, “easy does it”, “stick with the winners”… surely you’ve heard these and many other ancient slogans rattled off by old-timers in meetings, and without question most go over your head with little thought. But when taking a closer look, some of these hackneyed catchphrases can actually prove to be quite helpful. Here are 9 examples of everyday mottos you may stop taking for granted after actually taking them into consideration. Old-timers are old-timers for a reason, after all!

  1. “First Things First”

Well… yeah. Isn’t it always? It seems like a simple message – and that’s really because it is. When AAers remind you that the first things first, they’re really reminding you to stay focused on the day at hand and stop projecting. Stay in the present moment – ground yourself and focus on the task at hand. This slogan also alludes to the fact that sobriety must remain top priority, for, as another saying goes, “everything you put before your sobriety you are going to lose”.

  1. “Easy Does It”

Rome wasn’t built in a day. It isn’t likely that after a week of sobriety you are going to be a happy, healthy, productive member of society. Take it easy – give yourself a break. The slogan also reminds one to avoid trying to force solutions, that sometimes doing nothing is an action in itself. Take a step back and let the universe unfold as it should.

  1. “Live and Let Live”

This slogan simply suggests that one should focus on themselves and their own issues rather than the issues of those surrounding them. Live your life and let other live theirs. When an addict or alcoholic tries to run the show, things tend to end up a lot more complicated than they would have been otherwise.

  1. “One Day at a Time”

This slogan is pretty self-explanatory – and it also a universal trademark of Alcoholics Anonymous and many other 12-step programs across the globe. A major key to staying sober is facing every day as an individual feat. Wake up in the morning and tell yourself, “Today, I will not drink. If I still want to drink tomorrow I can.”

  1. “To Thine Own Self Be True”

So, this one was Shakespeare – we must give credit where credit is due. But AA has essentially adopted the quote and made it their own over the years, adding new significance to the famous words. Essentially, this line advises one to avoid engaging in self-deception. Lying to yourself will only hinder potential progress. Be honest and thorough, if not with anyone else, at least with yourself. And your sponsor.

  1. “Meeting Makers Make It”

This is probably the most straightforward of all AA clichés. If you go to meetings, you won’t get drunk. While regular attendance at meetings does undeniably help one stay sober, it is important that one engages in the meeting, pays attention to speakers, and fellowships before and after the convening to truly get the most out of each experience. So while this statement tends to lean towards true, if you sit in the back with your head in your hands, refusing to ask for help, you may not stay as sober as you’d like.

  1. “Wherever You Go, There You Are”

It is not uncommon for addicts and alcoholics to impulsively pick up and move across the country, believing that a geographic change will help them tame their symptoms. Many realize rather quickly that it isn’t so much the surroundings as it is an internal malady, and are forced to heal from the inside out rather than the outside in.

  1. “My Best Thinking Got Me Drunk”

Essentially, this slogan points out the fact that most addicts and alcoholics are so sick in the head that any thought they have is probably wrong. One of the predominant points of Alcoholics Anonymous is helping other alcoholics – especially when it comes to decision-making. If left to their own accord, most of the sober men and women in the rooms would undoubtedly be drunk. Or dead. If you think something is a good idea, ask! It most likely isn’t.

  1. “I Am Powerless But Not Helpless”

It is important to remember that powerlessness is entirely different than helplessness. While you may be powerless over drugs and alcohol, you are never helpless – it is your choice every day whether or not you pick up. Keep these helpful clichés in mind if you ever start to feel overwhelmed, and remember – stick with the winners!


The Hope Center

The Hope Center for Rehabilitation offers a full range of services both leading up to, during and following treatment, including professional interventions, a luxury, medically assisted detox program, inpatient rehabilitation (30-90 days), intensive out-patient rehabilitation and out-patient services. Each of our clients become a part of our alumni program at the completion of their treatment to help foster a continued community of recovery.

Copyright by The Hope Center 2016. All rights reserved.